Walker Avenue

Project Description:

Architectural design and planning services for a semi-detached house in Whitefield.

Proposed single storey rear extension.

Location:

Walker Avenue, Whitefield, Bury Council

Scope of Works:
  • Existing plans and elevations
  • Proposed design layout options
  • Householder planning application submission
  • Acting as agent during the determination period
  • Building regulations drawings
  • Coordination with structural engineer and contractor on site

This period semi-detached property is unique in its building orientation as it has a bay window to both the front and side elevations. The house has very little in terms of rear garden space as much of it is allocated to the side.

The existing kitchen was tucked away to the rear of the property, devoid of views and natural daylight. The clients discussed a clear and brief which was to establish an extension that would infill most of the rear garden space, enabling both the new living /dining area and kitchen to effectively ‘turn the corner’ and face the side garden.

There were planning challenges, particularly as the extension had to carefully avoid overshadowing and overbearing impact to the neighbouring semi detached property. As a result the proposed extension projected 3m as per planning restrictions, but stepped in and continued further out to gain more useable space. A new kitchen was installed and designed so that there would be views from the sink across the space and through the bifold doors towards the side garden.

The internal floor levels were raised significantly higher than the external ground level. When we explored ideas for the proposal we decided to create a series of small internal steps between the kitchen and dining / living areas so that they felt connected to the garden space rather than having the physical ‘barrier’ of external steps. This approach also allowed the overall scale of the extension to be lowered in scale on the neighbouring boundary without compromising on floor to ceiling heights.

The clients appointed Northedge Architecture to produce building regulations drawings and we assisted with coordinating with the builders on site, negotiating factors such as detailing of the roof build up. This scheme demonstrates that a small extension can help make use of limited external space and alter how the living spaces respond to it.

Walker Avenue

Project Description:

Architectural design and planning services for a semi-detached house in Whitefield.

Proposed single storey rear extension.

Location:

Walker Avenue, Whitefield, Bury Council

Scope of Works:
  • Existing plans and elevations
  • Proposed design layout options
  • Householder planning application submission
  • Acting as agent during the determination period
  • Building regulations drawings
  • Coordination with structural engineer and contractor on site

This period semi-detached property is unique in its building orientation as it has a bay window to both the front and side elevations. The house has very little in terms of rear garden space as much of it is allocated to the side.

The existing kitchen was tucked away to the rear of the property, devoid of views and natural daylight. The clients discussed a clear and brief which was to establish an extension that would infill most of the rear garden space, enabling both the new living /dining area and kitchen to effectively ‘turn the corner’ and face the side garden.

There were planning challenges, particularly as the extension had to carefully avoid overshadowing and overbearing impact to the neighbouring semi detached property. As a result the proposed extension projected 3m as per planning restrictions, but stepped in and continued further out to gain more useable space. A new kitchen was installed and designed so that there would be views from the sink across the space and through the bifold doors towards the side garden.

The internal floor levels were raised significantly higher than the external ground level. When we explored ideas for the proposal we decided to create a series of small internal steps between the kitchen and dining / living areas so that they felt connected to the garden space rather than having the physical ‘barrier’ of external steps. This approach also allowed the overall scale of the extension to be lowered in scale on the neighbouring boundary without compromising on floor to ceiling heights.

The clients appointed Northedge Architecture to produce building regulations drawings and we assisted with coordinating with the builders on site, negotiating factors such as detailing of the roof build up. This scheme demonstrates that a small extension can help make use of limited external space and alter how the living spaces respond to it.

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