Stretford

Project Description:

Architectural design services for a semi detached house in Stretford, Manchester.

Proposed orangery extension and new build annex to the rear of the garden.

Location:

Sandy Lane, Stretford, Manchester Council

Scope of Works:
  • Existing plans and elevations
  • Proposed design layout options
  • Householder planning application submission
  • Acting as agent during the determination period
  • Building regulations drawings.
  • On-site coordination with building contractors

The clients for this project were two families who initially had the idea for two individual projects at separate properties however through ongoing discussions they established that they desired for both families to live at the same address. Although the house was generous in size, it wasn’t deemed viable for them to share the same accommodation and as a result we explored concept proposals for a new build rear annex. The annex would serve as downsized accommodation for a couple who wished to plan for future needs of single level living.

The garden was generous in size and widened to the rear. With the removal of the existing rockery and shed, this created a sizeable plot for us to work with. However, the constraints were the unusual angular proportions of the boundary fences. Seeking to maximise the usable space for the annex, we worked with the angles of the site to create two zones of accommodation, one for living, the other for bedrooms. The space in between organically formed the entrance lobby that connected the two uses. The roof forms visually demonstrate this relationship, with a slate pitched roof over the habitable spaces and a flat roof allocated centrally.

The garden serves as the communal space that connects both families and this is accentuated further with the annex living room facing towards the original home. The open plan lounge, dining and kitchen area has a vaulted ceiling that increases the sense of light and space within what is otherwise a relatively small plot. Given the overall scale of the proposal, the council had stipulated planning restrictions that required separation distances from the boundaries. With this in mind, we sought to utilise this for the benefit of the occupants by proposing that they could use the perimeter space as their own private garden plot that surrounds them at all sides. Embracing this idea, we introduced side facing glazing to the dining, kitchen and bedroom spaces that would allow glimpses to the garden perimeter. The scheme was a creative and functional use of space that offers the new occupants a balance between familiarity to their original family home and a new start.

Stretford

Project Description:

Architectural design services for a semi detached house in Stretford, Manchester.

Proposed orangery extension and new build annex to the rear of the garden.

Location:

Sandy Lane, Stretford, Manchester Council

Scope of Works:
  • Existing plans and elevations
  • Proposed design layout options
  • Householder planning application submission
  • Acting as agent during the determination period
  • Building regulations drawings.
  • On-site coordination with building contractors

The clients for this project were two families who initially had the idea for two individual projects at separate properties however through ongoing discussions they established that they desired for both families to live at the same address. Although the house was generous in size, it wasn’t deemed viable for them to share the same accommodation and as a result we explored concept proposals for a new build rear annex. The annex would serve as downsized accommodation for a couple who wished to plan for future needs of single level living.

The garden was generous in size and widened to the rear. With the removal of the existing rockery and shed, this created a sizeable plot for us to work with. However, the constraints were the unusual angular proportions of the boundary fences. Seeking to maximise the usable space for the annex, we worked with the angles of the site to create two zones of accommodation, one for living, the other for bedrooms. The space in between organically formed the entrance lobby that connected the two uses. The roof forms visually demonstrate this relationship, with a slate pitched roof over the habitable spaces and a flat roof allocated centrally.

The garden serves as the communal space that connects both families and this is accentuated further with the annex living room facing towards the original home. The open plan lounge, dining and kitchen area has a vaulted ceiling that increases the sense of light and space within what is otherwise a relatively small plot. Given the overall scale of the proposal, the council had stipulated planning restrictions that required separation distances from the boundaries. With this in mind, we sought to utilise this for the benefit of the occupants by proposing that they could use the perimeter space as their own private garden plot that surrounds them at all sides. Embracing this idea, we introduced side facing glazing to the dining, kitchen and bedroom spaces that would allow glimpses to the garden perimeter. The scheme was a creative and functional use of space that offers the new occupants a balance between familiarity to their original family home and a new start.

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