Cawdor

Project Description:

Architectural design services for a semi detached house in Timperley.

Double storey side and rear extension with internal remodelling.

Location:

Cawdor Place. Timperley, Trafford Council

Scope of Works:
  • Existing plans and elevations
  • Proposed design layout options
  • Householder planning application submission
  • Acting as agent during the determination period
  • Building Regulations drawings
  • 3D interior design visualisations

Northedge Architecture were appointed for two projects through the same client, one at Cawdor Place, Timperley and the other at Homelands Road, Sale. This scheme was the larger of the two, with the client seeking extensive remodelling both internally and externally. Situated at the end of a cul-de-sac, the site is an irregular ‘wedge’ shape with the plot narrowing towards the front and significantly widening at the rear. Given the parameters we explored how the house could be increased in size through utilising the unused area to the side of the house.

Access was maintained to the garage and driveway which resulted in a stepped side extension that provided a downstairs WC and utility off the hallway. What was apparent on the first visit to the house was how the entrance hallway was disconnected to the living spaces due to the winding nature of the corridor. This made the entrance hall feel enclosed and disconnected. We addressed this through the removal of internal kitchen partitions which created a regular and open foyer area. A new glazed door and screen was introduced to between the hall and the open plan space which allowed views through.

We coordinated with Hudds Stuctural Engineers who produced a design to open up the living area with large spanning beams. We retained structure where possible which included the formation of a play room that would allow a dedicated space for the children and much needed storage. A chimney was integrated into the structural design to avoid columns and it’s position was ideal to allow both the living and dining areas to view it.

The kitchen was situated to the right side of the plan to allow appropriate drainage connections and a island was introduced as an intermediate feature between the kitchen and dining area. This serves a functional purpose as a breakfast bar that is orientated to face towards the corner glazing. The bifold doors open up views towards the garden, angling the aspect to the furthest part of the garden, thus giving the impression of a more generous external space.

The first floor extension was designed to provide a master suite, comprising of a dressing area en-suite. As with the ground floor, the proposal was designed to benefit from views over the garden with the introduction of a Juliet balcony. We detailed a vaulted ceiling to give the master bedroom more height and a greater sense of space which worked particularly well with the addition of rooflights that would pick up west and east daylight to what is an otherwise north facing room.

Northedge Architecture came up with a functional and creative use of the space, prioritising how to use areas of the plot that would otherwise serve little purpose. The scheme responds to the context through the orientation of spaces and this was a significant factor that won Trafford Council’s approval via the planning application process.

Cawdor

Project Description:

Architectural design services for a semi detached house in Timperley.

Double storey side and rear extension with internal remodelling.

Location:

Cawdor Place. Timperley, Trafford Council

Scope of Works:
  • Existing plans and elevations
  • Proposed design layout options
  • Householder planning application submission
  • Acting as agent during the determination period
  • Building Regulations drawings
  • 3D interior design visualisations

Northedge Architecture were appointed for two projects through the same client, one at Cawdor Place, Timperley and the other at Homelands Road, Sale. This scheme was the larger of the two, with the client seeking extensive remodelling both internally and externally. Situated at the end of a cul-de-sac, the site is an irregular ‘wedge’ shape with the plot narrowing towards the front and significantly widening at the rear. Given the parameters we explored how the house could be increased in size through utilising the unused area to the side of the house.

Access was maintained to the garage and driveway which resulted in a stepped side extension that provided a downstairs WC and utility off the hallway. What was apparent on the first visit to the house was how the entrance hallway was disconnected to the living spaces due to the winding nature of the corridor. This made the entrance hall feel enclosed and disconnected. We addressed this through the removal of internal kitchen partitions which created a regular and open foyer area. A new glazed door and screen was introduced to between the hall and the open plan space which allowed views through.

We coordinated with Hudds Stuctural Engineers who produced a design to open up the living area with large spanning beams. We retained structure where possible which included the formation of a play room that would allow a dedicated space for the children and much needed storage. A chimney was integrated into the structural design to avoid columns and it’s position was ideal to allow both the living and dining areas to view it.

The kitchen was situated to the right side of the plan to allow appropriate drainage connections and a island was introduced as an intermediate feature between the kitchen and dining area. This serves a functional purpose as a breakfast bar that is orientated to face towards the corner glazing. The bifold doors open up views towards the garden, angling the aspect to the furthest part of the garden, thus giving the impression of a more generous external space.

The first floor extension was designed to provide a master suite, comprising of a dressing area en-suite. As with the ground floor, the proposal was designed to benefit from views over the garden with the introduction of a Juliet balcony. We detailed a vaulted ceiling to give the master bedroom more height and a greater sense of space which worked particularly well with the addition of rooflights that would pick up west and east daylight to what is an otherwise north facing room.

Northedge Architecture came up with a functional and creative use of the space, prioritising how to use areas of the plot that would otherwise serve little purpose. The scheme responds to the context through the orientation of spaces and this was a significant factor that won Trafford Council’s approval via the planning application process.

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